EVGA GeForce GTX560 Ti 448 Cores CLASSIFIED 1280 MB GDDR5, Dual-DualLink DVI, HDMI, DisplayPort, SLI Graphics Cards 012-P3-2068-KR

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EVGA GeForce GTX560 Ti 448 Cores CLASSIFIED 1280 MB GDDR5, Dual-DualLink DVI, HDMI, DisplayPort, SLI Graphics Cards 012-P3-2068-KR

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  • Core Clock: 797MHz Memory Clock: 3900MHz Shader Clock: 1594MHz
  • CUDA Cores: 448
  • Microsoft DirectX 11 Support
  • NVidia Cuda, PhysX, PureVideo HD, 3D VisionSurround ready Technologies
  • NVidia 2-Way and 3-Way SLI ready
  • DisplayPort 1.1a Connector
  • HDMI 1.4a connector
  • Two Dual-Link DVI-I HDCP capable connectors

Discover the incredibly detailed world of DirectX 11 with the EVGA GeForce GTX560 Ti 448 Cores graphics card. loaded with the latest gaming technologies the EVGA GTX560 Ti 448 Cores delivers polished performance.
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EVGA GeForce GTX560 Ti 448 Cores CLASSIFIED 1280 MB GDDR5, Dual-DualLink DVI, HDMI, DisplayPort, SLI Graphics Cards 012-P3-2068-KR

EVGA GeForce GTX560 Ti 448 Cores CLASSIFIED 1280 MB GDDR5, Dual-DualLink DVI, HDMI, DisplayPort, SLI Graphics Cards 012-P3-2068-KR

List Price: $ 352.80

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3 thoughts on “EVGA GeForce GTX560 Ti 448 Cores CLASSIFIED 1280 MB GDDR5, Dual-DualLink DVI, HDMI, DisplayPort, SLI Graphics Cards 012-P3-2068-KR

  1. 10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Unapologetic; sucking power and burning silicon like the Countach of video cards., January 10, 2012
    By 
    Dustin Loftis (Wichita, KS USA) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: EVGA GeForce GTX560 Ti 448 Cores CLASSIFIED 1280 MB GDDR5, Dual-DualLink DVI, HDMI, DisplayPort, SLI Graphics Cards 012-P3-2068-KR (Personal Computers)

    My eVGA nVidia GeForce 7800 GTX 512, once an OEM-only benchmark smoking $750+ (in 2005 dollars 🙂 ) graphics card, has finally reached the point where new games aren’t playable at all, and new, entry-level cards are beginning to outrun it. It’s only taken 6 years. 😀

    If you are looking at this product, you are likely aware that the only thing it shares with the GTX560 Ti is the name. The rest of the hardware is a 570 with one additional multiprocessor disabled (possibly 570 chips with a core that didn’t pass muster). Great reviews of the underlying hardware are available from all the normal hardware testing sites, so I’ll focus on the eVGA and Classified portion of this card.

    I have dealt with eVGA hardware personally and professionally for going on six years now, and can find nothing bad to say about the company. Which is remarkable, coming from me. You get the feeling, owning their products, that they make the kind of products they themselves would like to own. They stand behind their hardware, offer awesome warranties (5, 10 or lifetime, depending on the hardware) and provide all the overclocking and monitoring tools you need.

    The Classified card is large; it took up all of the available space in my Alienware full tower between the drive cage and the PCI case slots. So much so, in fact, that I had to remove my IDE cable for lack of a place to run it, and both cards had to be inserted at an angle, lined up with the DVI ports and rotated into place. Seated and slotted, there is just enough room for a SATA cable to lay between the drive cage and the end of the card.

    I installed the cards in my eVGA X58 SLI 3x motherboard, pulling out my 7800. Though the card instructions recommended installation in the 1st and 3rd PCIe slot, I wanted dual-slot X16 bandwidth, not some hobbled x16/x8 monkey business. Knowing better, naturally, I placed then in the first two x16 slots. The fan side of these cards, with the red stripe, is bowed out, and when they were placed in the adjacent slots, I found that they actually pushed on each other, causing an awkward sort of lean in the plastic bezel.

    But they worked. So I fired up my system. Installation of the drivers was unremarkable, a couple of reboots later I was up and running. The problem I immediately noticed was brought to light by eVGA’s own precision software. At idle (as idle as Aero gets, at least) GPU2 was sitting at a comfortable 37C, while GPU1 sweated up around 50C. Launching a game with SLI brought the temperatures up. The cooling system in the card will rev the fans up to keep the temperatures from exceeding 70C, and GPU2 hit that. GPU1 went much farther than that. I consider water-boiling temperatures to be too high for my comfort. Playing an older game like TF2 didn’t cause a problem, other than my concern that one card was 30C hotter than the other. Running a DirectX11 demo program with tessellation utilized the card fully, however, and my system soon rebooted itself.

    After the second reboot in two days, that little nagging “install in X16 slots 1 and 3” kept coming up in my mind, and so I did a little research about the impact of x16/x16 versus x16/x8. I found that the experts noted only a performance different of 5-6 FPS in most games (and we’re not running below 60). The SLI bridge makes up a lot of the difference, it appears. So I moved GPU2 to the third x16 slot and now both cards stay about the same temperature all of the time, I have had no problems playing games. With the notable exception that my mouse-tracking in some games has improved so much that I have to adjust my FPS habits to compensate for the changes.

    So the Classified cards are huge, they need a lot of juice (6 pin AND 8 pin on each) and I see no possible way to actually run three of these in SLI without replacing the heatsink with a waterblock to get rid of the heat. That being said, they are built for overclocking, and for the price of one of these cards, you can speed it up to compete easily with much more expensive choices. And the eVGA logo on the edge of the card lights up white. Shame on eVGA for not printing in their installation manual: “No, stupid, I said use the 1st and 3rd slots. I don’t care what you think you know about bandwidth as it applies to SLI, do what I say before you burn your house down.”

    I’m hoping for another 6 years with this next generation of eVGA graphics cards.

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  2. 8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Great Card!, December 22, 2011
    By 
    Karen D. Andon Sansur “Karen Daisy” (Santo Domingo , REP DOM) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: EVGA GeForce GTX560 Ti 448 Cores CLASSIFIED 1280 MB GDDR5, Dual-DualLink DVI, HDMI, DisplayPort, SLI Graphics Cards 012-P3-2068-KR (Personal Computers)

    The card is GREAT, Performs almost as good as a GTX 570 (5% – 6% in performance).

    And performs BETTER than a GTX 570 if you overclock it.

    Battlefield 3 on Ultra settings (Everything max) will run in about 42 – 57 fps. Turn AA off and you will get 55+ (Ultra) on high it will run above 60+ FPS always.

    Since I haven’t used the card that much I will list the Cons and Pros so far..

    Pros:

    -Clocked at 797mhz instead of 750mhz from MSI and 765mhz from Zotac.

    -Looks Great!

    -EVGA logo on card has a white led so it look’s good if you have a case with a side window.

    -Comes with a awesome case badge.

    Cons:

    -Big card. (Not to me but it is for a lot of people)

    -Hard to SLI in the future since it may disappear after a while..

    Conclusion:

    It is a great card for the price, I would give it a solid 9/10.

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  3. 4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    Great card for the money, January 22, 2012
    By 
    D. Cahill (MA) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    Amazon Verified Purchase(What’s this?)
    This review is from: EVGA GeForce GTX560 Ti 448 Cores CLASSIFIED 1280 MB GDDR5, Dual-DualLink DVI, HDMI, DisplayPort, SLI Graphics Cards 012-P3-2068-KR (Personal Computers)

    I’ve been wanting a new video card to replace my aging nvidia 8800GT that has served me well for many years now. After reviewing dozens of cards, I took a chance on this GTX560 as a worthy replacement candidate. So far it has met all my expectations.

    Before buying a new graphics card, my concerns were the basics for items such as stability, reliability, performance, and noise. Several of these items I could only gauge based on reviews and feedback from others. I’ll address each of these items to the best of my knowledge and experience with the 560Ti 448 Core so far.

    Stability: This card has been rock solid since the moment I’ve installed it. I’ve not yet encountered any strange problems in games. The most noteworthy item I’ve encountered is that Steam warns me that my card was not identifiable in their database or that I may not be running the latest video drivers. I believe this has to do with the 448 core release. I’m currently still using the graphics drivers that have shipped with the card that came on the CD. nvidia has to incorporate this card into their general 500 series release before it will be recognized by their installer. So far I’ve not had any issues with the games I play.

    Reliability: Given that I’ve only had this graphics card for about a month, I can’t really give any kind of reliability rating other than 1-month. The card comes with a 3-year warranty which I didn’t realize at the time of purchasing. I made an incorrect assumption of lifetime warranty support on an EVGA graphics card. That was my own mistake. EVGA does offer the ability to extend the warranty at a nominal cost for anyone that is concerned. It can be extended from 3-years to either 5 or 7 years based on the amount you’re willing to pay.

    Performance: So far this graphics card has not disappointed me. Given that I made the jump from an 8800GT to a GTX560Ti, I moved several generations upward in graphics performance. I’m currently driving a 24″ (1920×1200) panel with all my games. So far this card has provided a very positive experience in the fluidity of game play. For the hardcore gamers looking for benchmark numbers…I don’t have any.

    Noise: The noise of the GTX560 Ti 448 cores is very acceptable. At idle desktop use, the graphics card noise is almost inaudible. I’m currently using an Antec P183 case and it sits on top of my desk within 18″ inches of my ears. The idle temps are in the 50C range and the two large fans and heat sink do a good job keeping it cool enough at lower RPMs to not make for an annoyance. During game play there is an audible difference. I can hear the fans a little bit more, but it has not detracted from any game play nor has it become annoying. The fans have never increased in RPM enough to ever become annoying. I also have yet to overclock this card, so that may make a difference in the noise level of the fans if I decide to do this in the future.

    Other notable items with this card are that it’s important to make sure you have the two PCIe power cables, one 6-pin and 1 8-pin. I’m powering my system with a PC Power & Cooling 750W PSU which has no problems handing my system. Also make sure to measure inside your case to determine if you have room for this video card. This is a rather long video card. In my Antec P183, I had to move the top-most hard drive bay down one bay and remove the drive carrier from within the case in order to fit this card.

    Here are the specs for the system used in reviewing this card:
    Primary System:

    CPU: Intel Core i7 860 (2.8 GHz Lynnfield)
    HSF: Thermalright MUX-120
    Motherboard: Gigabyte P55M-UD4
    Memory: 4x 2GB Corsair XMS3 DDR3 (8-8-8-24 1.65v)
    Video: EVGA 560Ti 448 cores CLASSIFIED
    Case: Antec P183
    Power: PC Power & Cooling 750W
    Storage: WD 300GB Raptor 10K RPM
    Storage: 2x Samsung 1TB 7200 RPM (Spinpoint F3 HD103SJ)
    DVD: Sony Optiarc AD-7240S
    1st Display: Dell U2410 24′ LCD (H-IPS panel)
    2nd Display: Dell 2001FP 20.1′ (IPS panel)
    Cooling: Scythe S-FLEX SFF21D 120mm Case Fan
    OS: Windows 7 64-bit Ultimate

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